Using a query table to represent a 1:M relationship spatially

I first discovered (and used) the Make Query Table tool during my second week at Aurecon (March 13 2012, according to my OneNote). This was about a month before I started using ModelBuilder (to combat the frustrations of ArcMap), and about 6 months before I started Python (to combat the frustrations of ModelBuilder).

I’m just giving a bit of context because this was before everything clicked into place for me. Before this point, I treated everything I learnt in my studies and during my internship as separate silos of information: GIS, Databases, Programming.

I did not even realise until after I was working at Aurecon that the query expressions used in ArcMap are SQL, despite me studying all those things. It just shows how one’s mindset can block progress, and how I allowed the awful experience of learning Computer Science in Afrikaans to stop me from letting things “click” for so long.

Back to the tool. Joins in ArcGIS are notoriously slow, and 1:M joins are not allowed (technically they are, but in the sense that an arbitrary matching feature will be joined). Naturally, the relationship between the GIS and the asset register is 1:M.

For example, a single point is used to represent the physical, spatial location of an asset, reservoir WRV-00001. In the asset register, this reservoir is unbundled into various components – storage tank, building, fence etc. Each of these assets have their own unique asset ID, but all have the same GIS ID.

I now need to represent all these assets spatially. The points/lines will all be on top of each other, but that’s fine. The Make Query Table tool does exactly this, but it is…quirky. I’ve compiled a list of things to remember when using this tool (supplemented by this question on GIS.SE):

  1. Tables/feature classes in the relationship should be stored within the same database: I tend to remember this step only after I add the inputs and the tool shouts at me.
  2. Add the feature class first in the multivalue parameter: The format of the input relies on the format of the first argument in the multivalue parameter control. The feature class should be added first to ensure that the output is a layer, otherwise it will be a table view.
  3. Enclose table names and field names in quotes: For example, I wish to join the asset register table ar to the point layer points using their common field GIS_ID. By default, the tool encloses my whole expression in quotes "points.GIS_ID" = "ar.GIS_ID". This will cause the tool to fail. Add extra quotes around the field names "points"."GIS_ID" = "ar"."GIS_ID".
  4. Choose the NO_KEY_FIELD option: Trying to add key fields causes some erratic behaviour (???). Just don’t do it. By selecting this option, the existing ObjectID field from the input will be used.
  5. The output layer will appear to have no symbology: Go into the Layer properties, click the Symbology tab, click the existing symbol, then OK, OK. It’s a bug./li>
  6. Persist to disk!: Remember to export the layer to a feature class, otherwise the layer will only exist in the map document.
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